Author Archives: Maximilian Auffhammer

About Maximilian Auffhammer

Maximilian Auffhammer is the George Pardee Associate Professor of International Sustainable Development at the University of California Berkeley. His fields of expertise are environmental and energy economics, with a specific focus on the impacts and regulation of climate change and air pollution.

The Big Stick: Cap and Trade in the Peoples Republic of Carbon

Many of us have argued that a patchwork of national or subnational climate policies is a largely pointless undertaking unless the big two (United States and China) are part of that patchwork. The US has taken some steps towards national … Continue reading

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What’s the goal and point of national biofuel regulation?

While preparing a lecture for the 4th Berkeley Summer School in Environmental and Energy Economics, I returned to contemplating the regulation of biofuels as part of a federal strategy to combat climate change and increase energy security. If we review … Continue reading

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What we don’t know about economic climate change impacts

A relatively recent econometric literature examines the impact of weather/climate on a variety of outcomes of economic interest. In order to provide an estimate of a climate impact you need two things: An estimate of how a sector responds to … Continue reading

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The Yoga Theorem

With yesterday’s historical release of the EPA’s new carbon emissions policy, I took an extra day to comb through and digest the news. I have organized my intermediate microeconomics class around something called the “Yoga Theorem.” This almost universal truth … Continue reading

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Your tax dollars hard at work. EIA’s new data portals.

We empirical economists get very excited about finding or generating new data sets. There are big returns to splicing together different data sources to answer new and interesting questions. This is hard work and not everyone is good at it. … Continue reading

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It just doesn’t add up. Why I think not building Keystone XL will likely leave a billion barrels worth of bitumen in the ground.

I am not a fan of blanket statements. Whenever oil sands come up in casual conversation, many of my economist friends argue that “the stuff will come out of the ground whether we like it or not”. When the discussion … Continue reading

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Why the cool kids are flocking to energy and not water economics

Why do kids like to go to birthday parties? Because there is lots of sugar and other kids. Academic economists are not that different. Energy economics has attracted a lot of new bright minds both young and not so young. … Continue reading

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